Wednesday, April 16, 2014
You can’t say “I don’t do politics”, because silence is a political statement. Tariq Ramadan (via shandog)

(Source: uniteforpalestine)

Sunday, March 9, 2014
kennethparcelll:

I’M CRYING

kennethparcelll:

I’M CRYING

Sunday, March 2, 2014
The story is compelling, and it cut off near the end of season one with a cliffhanger that was genuinely startling, not just for the speed with which it showed Will realizing that Hannibal was a devious killer (a twist most series would’ve saved for season two or three) but for the way it messed with our collective image of Lecter as the killer from The Silence of the Lambs, an incarcerated fiend dispensing bons mots to visiting FBI agents. In season one, Hannibal frames Will for murders that Hannibal himself committed or abetted, to the point of literally planting an incriminating ear inside Will’s alimentary canal; at the start of season two, Hannibal takes Will’s place as FBI profiler and occasionally visits him behind bars to ask for his “help” with ongoing cases, inquire about his well-being, and otherwise glean information that can permit him to sustain his deception.

Intriguing as these variations are, though, they’re not the source of Hannibal’s specialness; in fact, Fox’s much dumber and clumsier serial-killer drama The Following pulls off similarly “shocking” twists each and every week, in its determination to be Se7en meets 24, or some such thing. It’s a classic example of script-delivery TV, signaling every scare with a shrieking music cue, covering action and dialogue with multiple shaky cameras, and otherwise behaving as if horror’s only purpose is to set up sledgehammer-obvious scares. Hannibal, in contrast, approaches similar subject matter in a thoughtful way. It does not restrict itself to The Following’s tedious binary of “Something horrible is about to happen” and “Oh my God, that was horrible!” You could say it’s as close as a broadcast network has gotten to the personal artistry of the best premium-cable shows, if it weren’t bolder and more elegant than anything on pay cable right now, including HBO’s own serial-killer drama, True Detective.
Hannibal Season 2: I Can’t Get This Show Out of My Head
Wednesday, February 12, 2014

(Source: othishome)

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

feministcaptainmorgan:

I hate having to over validate what I say.

(Source: hometownsarehell)

Saturday, February 1, 2014
I’m definitely pro-selfie. I think that anybody who’s anti-selfie is really just a hater. Because, truthfully, why shouldn’t people take pictures of themselves? When I’m on Instagram and I see that somebody took a picture of themselves, I’m like, ‘Thank you.’ I don’t need to see a picture of the sky, the trees, plants. There’s only one you. I could Google image search ‘the sky’ and I would probably see beautiful images to knock my socks off. But I can’t Google, you know, ‘What does my friend look like today?’ For you to be able to take a picture of yourself that you feel good enough about to share with the world – I think that’s a great thing. Ezra Koenig being an angel [x] (via reti-cent)
Friday, December 20, 2013
Let me tell you what I do know: I am more than one thing, and not all of those things are good. The truth is complicated. It’s two-toned, multi-vocal, bittersweet. I used to think that if I dug deep enough to discover something sad and ugly, I’d know it was something true. Now I’m trying to dig deeper. Richard Siken;  Editor’s Pages: Black Telephone
Wednesday, July 31, 2013

How does anyone connect with anyone? The woman I was with recently is great but I see that I upset her balance. I have only good intentions but I feel intrusive and strange. I want to be with her but I think my presence stresses her out. It hurts to know I have this effect. This is why I just book tours, go and keep going. What is there to stop for? I try to connect with someone and find I’m too strange, too inherently fucked up, too something. You’re better off as that thing on a stage. I see people together all the time. I can’t understand how it works. When I go out with women I feel like Travis Bickle. Like I’ll do something really horrible and have no idea why I sent her running away. I think it’s one of the reasons I have sometimes ended up with psycho women. At least I don’t freak them out. This one’s different.

She is real and she is rare. I don’t know if I am all that easy to be around. I am working hard to figure myself out before I die.

Henry Rollins - Smile, You’re Travelling (via deadpunk666)

It’s like he’s in my head.

Sunday, June 23, 2013

agentotter:

islandofmisfitt0ys:

deviantfemme:

pratfall:

how to dress for your shape: are you human-shaped? play up your natural sex appeal by wearing whatever the fuck you want

Life Tip: As the weather gets warmer, continue to wear whatever the fuck you want. Flaunt everything or keep it cool under cover. Dress to make yourself feel rad.

how to get a bikini body:
put a bikini on your body

Want to look great naked? Take all your clothes off.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

how to decode a person with an anxiety disorder

brttaperry:

lundibix:

This is by far one of the most important things I’ve seen on tumblr because It describes things I was not able to

Read More

Sunday, April 7, 2013

reallyreallyreallytrying:

People who euphemistically refer to “the pitter-patter of tiny feet” seem to think that babies spring lightly & dextrously from foot to foot, rather than rolling & screaming like tiny fat meatworms

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 Tuesday, May 29, 2012
Many men who harass women say their intent is to compliment them, but why do they usually not “compliment” women who are accompanied by other men and often only do it when a woman is alone? Why do they tend to object to other men “complimenting” their female significant other (if applicable), female friends, or female family members? Why do some men grow hostile and violent when women do not thank them and act flattered? Why do they feel compelled to compliment women at all? Rarely are they expecting a date. Many times they do not even wait to see a woman’s reaction as they fly by in their car or as they turn to start harassing the next woman. They are doing it to exert their power, to entertain their friends, to relieve boredom, or do demonstrate that they can evaluate a complete stranger to her face, just because she is a woman.

Stop Street Harassment: Holly Kearl (via completelymoribund)

The thing that so many men need to understand is that women do not consider it a compliment when they are being harassed on the street. Women usually feel either embarrassed or terrified or a combination of the two. So stop fucking doing it.

(via sexytypewriter)

it’s so telling that men tend to do this when they’re in a group of other men. and i’ve never had it happen when i’m hanging out with dudes, especially not when i’m with my ginormous dad (most men don’t give a fuck about harassing me if i’m with my mom who is as small as i am). so if it isn’t sexual, or threatening, and you just want to ~make me smile~ then why can you only do it when i’m perceived as vulnerable?

(via hyper—ballad)

I would add that it rarely happens or when I am around men who know that I am dating someone at that time. Many men (certainly not all) are willing to lay off if they perceive that you are “owned” - otherwise, you’re public property, and they’re free to treat you however they like. Any competition that erupts is less to flatter the woman than to establish temporary rights to her, even if they must degrade her to do so.

(via desliz)

that or the nature of the so-called compliments will change if youre w a man. they will go from a respectful “you look beautiful this evening” when youre w a dude to some vulgar shit about your pussy, if youre alone. because youre not worthy of respect as just a woman.

(via baddominicana)

My sister got a flat tire in the freeway yesterday. She had nine cars roll down their window and yell how good she looked and how great her ass was, but not a single car stopped to help her.

Thanks for the compliments, you pieces of crap.

(via i-gloriana)

(Source: ecr5068)

Monday, April 23, 2012
No one should have to be the “strong one” for someone else all the time. It creates a culture in which some people expect to always be coddled, while some people never feel like they’re allowed to break down and be taken care of, and that’s toxic. minorearth on

Captain Awkward, “The lie of ‘strength.’”

(Source: acatnamedhercules)